Friday, June 14, 2013

Writing for Wolves - What to Include!

*OFFICIAL COMMENT PERIOD IS NOW CLOSED*
*Delisting of the gray wolf is still being considered; if you want to make your voice heard in an unofficial way, hand-write a letter and mail it to: 
Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington DC 20240




Please help wolves!
The Obama administration has officially proposed removing gray wolves from the federal Endangered Species List EVERYWHERE IN THE UNITED STATES. That means that they won't be federally protected. Before the proposal goes through, there is a 90 day period for public comment. 
The comment period is NOW MORE THAN HALFWAY GONE! Here's where to submit your comment: http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-HQ-ES-2013-0073-43030
Also, please copy your letter and email it to: feedback@ios.doi.gov 
Every comment counts! Here's what you might want your letter to include. Feel free to use the exact words, but read through first (I encourage you to try to use you own reasons in addition)! Remember to be RESPECTFUL, use proper grammar and spelling, and try not to base your whole argument on emotion - use scientific references if you can! Talk about personal experiences with wolves and why they are important to YOU and young people across the nation. Remember that there is a 5000 CHARACTER LIMIT! (If you have any questions or want to run your letter by me, comment on this post or email at kids4wolves@gmail.com!) Thank you!
Please comment "done" on this post when you've sent the letter so we can get an idea of how many people are writing! If you're willing, paste your whole letter - we'd love to hear what you're saying!
                                                                      -------
  I oppose the proposal to remove gray wolves from the federal Endangered Species List.
     Wolves are still extinct in most of the states across the nation, yet if this proposal were to go through, wolves would be considered NOT endangered in those states. In the states of Washington and Oregon, only about 50 wolves exist, yet these would also be considered a not-endangered - "recovered" - population. Under the Endangered Species Act, species cannot be taken off the endangered species list unless they are recovered - which gray wolves are not! If wolves are removed from the endangered species list, then each state will manage their own wolves. States have a history of killing as many wolves as possible, often using inhumane and unscientific methods.There are still many habitats in the U.S. where wolves have the potential to thrive, but have yet to move into those areas; there is no science in removing protection in places where wolves have yet to recover - specifically the Pacific Northwest, California, the Northeast, and the southern Rocky Mountains. Wolves have sustainable populations in Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota; federal protection has already been removed in those areas. The only thing that will be accomplished under this proposal is removing federal protection in states that don't yet have a recovered wolf population. This is illogical and goes against the available science (as many independent scientists have expressed). The decision to remove a species from the Endangered Species List is supposed to be based on the best available science (as you claim it is), but the scientists whose work is referenced in your proposal themselves voiced their strong disagreements (and I quote): "“Based on a careful review of the rule, we do not believe that the rule reflects the conclusions of our work or the best available science concerning the recovery of wolves, or is in accordance with the fundamental purpose of the Endangered Species Act to conserve endangered species and the ecosystems upon which they depend.” Please base your decision on the actual best available science, not the best available politics.
     Many young people care deeply about this issue. I am a member of a group called Kids4Wolves. We work to educate ourselves, our peers, and adults about the truth of wolves - both the good and the not so good (but solvable). We also work to get other young people involved in the process, to keep the policy makers honest when they make these decisions. After all, my generation will have to be the ones to live with the benefits or consequences of whatever your generation decides today. It is critical that you consider all sides to this issue. Young people in the United States are perhaps the group to be most effected by your decision.  I implore you to reconsider your proposal to remove federal protection for gray wolves across the whole United States.
Thank you.
                                                   -----------------------------------

Mexican gray wolves - the most endangered wolf in the world with only about 75 living in the wild - will also be impacted by this proposal. Go here http://www.regulations.gov/#!submitComment;D=FWS-R2-ES-2013-0056-0001 to speak up for Mexican gray wolves! Here are some talking points to include in your comment: http://www.mexicanwolves.org/index.php/news/1046/51/Take-Action-Comments-Needed-to-Ensure-Mexican-Wolves-Future



10 comments:

  1. These precious animals that God created should not be destoyed without a reason. I believe people make all sorts of pathetic excuses just to kill them.

    Furthermore, they help balance the ecosystem. Please, protect these wolves, and stop peeling off their fur for coats and for fun. These creatures need protection & peace.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Taking wolves of the Endangered Species List would be a terrible mistake by this country. Wolves are just starting to flourish in areas where they have not been seen for fifty years. If we as a country do not protect wolves, we will no longer see wolves in wild. Wolves are a crucial part of North America's ecosystem keeping other animals population in check. When one crucial part of an ecosystem is removed other aspects of the ecosystem are put in threat of extinction and will eventually go extinct themseleves.
    Many culture have worshipped wolves. To take away the wolf this country would not only be destroying such a majestic animal, but also be destroying a part of Native cultures throughout North America.
    Wolves are one of the Earths most beautiful creatures. Wolves are much like humans acting as a family day in and day out. This species is shy to mankind and rarely come into human contact. Wolves are not only beautiful but are also incredibly intelligent animals and to destroy them would be a waste.
    Wolves only purpose one threat to our daily lives. That threat is against ranchers live stock. Research has been done that shows a very low percentage to yearly live stock losses. That reason alone does not justifie the decimation of a species. There have been cases that show various inexpensive ways to keep wolves from killing livestock. If ranchers across the country would implement these solutions the ranchers will see a decrease in livestock losses and attacks. This is a solution that would resolve both rancher and wolve supporters concerns.
    Please do not take the wolf of the Endangered Species List. Wolves are extremely beautiful animals and one animal that deserves to keep living a this earth.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Do not remove the wolf from the Endangered Species list. If they are, hunters will strip them from their natural habitat and eventually cause the wolf species to go existent. They play an important part in our environment. Without wolves their preys would expand in numbers, buffaloes, deer, rabbits, whatever they can find would repopulate. Who would be there to control the numbers? Not wolves if they're gone. Please let them remain on the Endangered Species list so mankind won't destroy their existence.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Dont trust Governments and Hunters..Keep Up the Good Fight..
    Rik Whistler for Wolves..
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hg3SDuAA4Os

    ReplyDelete
  5. The link is broken! Whenever I try to even enter the regulations.gov page I'm redirected to this: http://erule-outage.erulemaking.net/outage/regsoutage.htm#!home

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is now fixed. It was down for several days. Here is the link we have been using http://1.usa.gov/11yUotL If, for some reason you cannot comment, but you should be able to now, please e-mail Director Sally Jewell. See my post below for some talking points and my e-mail if you would like more. I have prepared them from various conservation organizations and have distributed them back to those same organizations, friends, etc. IT IS LEGAL TO COMMENT MORE THAN ONCE! So, if you think of something later, you can go comment again.

      This must be done by September 11th, unless they extend the deadline which they might. Please do all you can to help wolves! The delisting is illegal under the ESA as they are doing it for political reasons and they tampered with the peer review and got caught! See my post below.

      Maggie Schafer
      feline@wyo2u.com

      Delete
  6. Done. Used every single letter on this

    ReplyDelete
  7. You can also go to this website - it is the website for official comments -

    http://1.usa.gov/11yUotL

    You must do this by Sept. 11th. You may comment more than once and you can comment for others - get their permission and fill in their info. Do not say you are commenting for a 3rd party - that is for organizations, etc. Just do the info as if you were the person commenting. THIS IS LEGAL! The more comments the better - remember - the bad guys are commenting also.

    Do e-mail Sally Jewell and tell her that this is an illegal delisting under the ESA - you cannot delist for political reasons, which is exactly what this is. She and Dan Ashes of the USFWS tampered with the peer review process by banning wolf biologists from commenting which is also illegal and they got caught! There is no science behind this. THAT is a really big point to make. Wolves are only in 9 states so that are not recovered. In WY, MT, ID wolf pups are killed in their dens; in ID live dogs are used as bait - they get puppies from Craig's List and nail their feet to trees so they cry and lure wolves. They brag about this on facebook. In WYO wolves can be hunted anywhere, anytime, adults, pups etc. without a license and are being lured out of Yellowstone. They have killed all of the collared research wolves. DIRECTOR DAN ASHE CONSIDERS THIS GOOD MANAGEMENT BUT IT IS EXTINCTION! These are things to e-mail to Jewell and put on the government website!

    I am a wildlife biologist and I have prepared talking points taken from many of the conservation organizations who have been commenting. If you would like for me to e-mail those to you, please e-mail me with your info and I will forward what I have prepared. Time is running out, so we need to hurry!

    Maggie Schafer
    Boulder, CO
    feline@wyo2u.com

    ReplyDelete
  8. Do not hurt these amazing gentle creatures that have done nothing to deserve any forms of punishment. Wolves hunt to live, humans hunt for fun. Something isn't right here. Killing them won't make anyone more of a man, or stronger in any way, it just makes them less of a human being. Less caring. It just makes them more stupid, inconsiderate, disrespectful, cruel and mean. Wolves are an important part of this planet, whether people like it or not, and they deserve to stay on this planet just as much as we do. We shouldn't silence their music, we should let the future generations hear their song and recognize their beauty, and really see them for the beautiful animals they are. You wouldn't want to be hunted, what makes you think the wolves would? It's not fun to have a shotgun pointed in your face followed by a huge rush of pain, and then never seeing the world again, never seeing the ones you love again. They have to walk around on their guard every moment of their life, cautiously avoiding any threaths and death mainly caused by humans. Is it really fair? No it's not. They are just like dogs, but all the rude people out in the world want to hunt one and keep the other one as a pet. To all the people out there who have a heart, who can see the beauty in things, who actually care, let's howl together to save the wolves. Because one howl has a thousand meanings. Save the wolves!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Soy de Argentina y me parece que son unas criaturas recientemente salvadas del peligro de extinción. Son animales muy sociables y con mucha personalidad, por lo que la perdida de un individuo en cada manada es catastrófico. Es muy importante aprender a querer la naturaleza, no pueden cazar por el simple hecho de matar. Ellos merecen vivir tanto como ustedes, y sufren los mismos dolores. Basta de cazar!

    ReplyDelete